The mission of The Lexington School is to provide an education of the highest quality to students in preschool through middle school. In a structured, nurturing environment, The Lexington School seeks to instill integrity, a life-long enthusiasm for learning, and a strong work ethic.

 

Tag: mission skills

Environmental Debates: Another Capstone Challenge

The 8th grade capstone year is filled with leadership and academic rite of passages unique to The Lexington School. These challenges prepare our young adults for what’s next–high school, college, and life. One of the final projects before packing their gear for the Southwest Trip is Environmental Debates where...

Preschool Project Work Builds Curiosity by Donna Hutton

How do you teach curiosity? Project work has some answers. Donna Hutton, Director of Preschool at The Lexington School helps us understand a world where asking questions leads children on an unparalleled path of exploration and discovery where we see that spark, the start of the desire to know...

On RESILIENCE: All Those Little Things Add Up.

Hanae is next to tell the story of Mission Skills and how they affected this 2016 graduation class. Her story is about the small things that add up, the first teetering walk on playground tires or the tireless process of draft after draft for that paper. All moments of challenge with...

On TEAMWORK: Lexington School Grads Speak

Did you know that three out of every four people are afraid of public speaking? Imagine now that you are fourteen standing in front of hundreds of people at your graduation ceremony. It’s no small feat, yet Lexington School school leaders do it every year. This year their topic...

To Commence is to Begin: The Lexington School Graduation Tradition

When we take to the grass to find our seats at The Lexington School’s commencement ceremony, we see familiar faces with watery eyes. There are always tears. Parents cry, graduates cry, teachers cry, and it’s not because everybody is happy it’s all over. It’s because it is a rite of...

You Can Lead Them to Water

Imagine you teach English. You are in charge of your classroom. You must read the text and plan your points so you can lead discussion with your clever interpretations. You must know more than your students. Now imagine you are an English student. You must sit quietly and listen to what...